Thursday, June 27, 2013

Hawthorn Welcomes New Faculty Member Helayne Waldman, Ed.D., M.S.

Hawthorn University extends a warm welcome to new faculty member Helayne Waldman, Ed.D., M.S.

Dr. Waldman has been an educator for the past thirty years and has specialized in holistic nutrition education for the past seven. She received her doctorate at the University of San Francisco, her nutrition training at Bauman College of Holistic Nutrition, and has taught previously at San Francisco State University, Mills College, Bauman College and the Helsinki School of Economics and Business Administration. In addition to teaching, Dr. Waldman maintains a private practice in Oakland, CA, where she specializes in working with those affected by breast cancer. She recently co-authored the book The Whole Food Guide For Breast Cancer Survivors, is on the Board of the Annie Appleseed Organization (education and advocacy for cancer patients and professionals), and is affiliated with the medical offices of Bay Area Breast Surgeons in Oakland, CA, and Dr. Misha Cohen in San Francisco. She lectures widely around the country, is a called upon media expert in breast cancer and nutrition, and a guest blogger for the Pink Paper, GreenMedInfo, 4Wholeness.com and other health and wellness websites and publications.

We look forward to your presence at Hawthorn!

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Cholesterol: Understanding This Misunderstood Molecule

Please join us on Tuesday July 2nd, 2013 at 4pm pacific / 7pm eastern as we host Hawthorn University faculty member Dr. Robert Maki, ND for a webinar entitled "Cholesterol: Understanding This Misunderstood Molecule."

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death in the US, affecting approximately 65 million Americans. In fact, it is estimated that close to 1 million Americans suffer a heart attack each year. As a result, much of the attention has been placed on cholesterol. In this webinar, we will discuss what cholesterol is, how it works and the role it plays in CVD. This webinar will give you a better understanding of this critically important, but highly misunderstood molecule and hopefully dispel some common misconceptions.

Dr. Robert Maki is a Naturopathic Doctor and a graduate of Bastyr University in Seattle, WA. Dr. Maki is also a faculty member at Hawthorn University and maintains a private practice in Southern California, which is focused on Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT) and other hormonal problems such as Diabetes, thyroid disorders and weight loss. In addition to his private practice and role at Hawthorn, Dr. Maki is the host of a healthy weight loss podcast on iTunes titled “The Dr. Rob Show.”

To participate online and to view the webinar click here and follow the online registration instructions.

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Hiding in Plain Sight: What your Dentition and Oral Health May Mean For the Rest of Your Health


Please join us on Tuesday June 18th, 2013 at 4pm pacific / 7pm eastern as we host Hawthorn University faculty member Dr. Eric Wood, ND for a webinar entitled “Hiding in Plain Sight: What your Dentition and Oral Health May Mean For the Rest of Your Health.” 

This webinar will reveal a foundational connection between much of what we do to our mouth in our lifetime and what we eat to our subsequent physical body development and potential future health issues.  Research illustrates that the simple choice of bottle vs breast feeding can have lasting health effects for the rest of our lives.  The choices and habits affecting our dental health we form in our childhood and into adulthood continue to impact our health monumentally for the rest of our lives.  Examples of areas that will be focused on this presentation include:
1) The ramifications of amalgam fillings on health.
2) Root canals and their connection to creating systemic disturbances and a myriad of possible health problems.
3) Weston Price Studies re: human’s physical appearance, dentition, and the impact of one’s diet on such points.
4) Understanding the Chinese/European medicine-derived Tooth Meridian chart and its wisdom for understanding seemingly ‘unrelated other health issues.
5) Dental Occlusions/Malocclusions, their correlation to dietary intake, their correlations to bottle feeding vs breast feeding, palate development, and more.  Moreover, these points will be connected to incidence studies of other health problems including mouth breathing, increased incidence of cavities, and more.
6)  Braces and/or other functional dental appliances—the pros & cons on their use re: cranial structure/function and overall health.

Dr. Eric Wood is a board certified naturopathic doctor and graduate of the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine in Toronto, Canada.  He received additional training and experience via Harvard University’s Benson Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, and specialty cancer centers including the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, the Issels Clinic, and Medicor (Canada).  He has worked as a specialty physician with some of the leading supplement companies in North America including Neuroscience Inc. and Life Extension, focusing on oncology, adrenal fatigue, and infectious disease.  He has practiced naturopathic medicine across the US and currently serves as medical director for a Florida based anti-aging Medical Clinic.  As an Associate Professor of Nutrition at Hawthorn University (California), he works remotely with graduate students from across the globe.  Additionally, he is currently completing two book projects, one on the Paleolithic diet and another on Adrenal Fatigue.  A certified Neuro-endocrine immune specialist, he has completed considerable additional training in hormone replacement, detoxification, European Biological Medicine, HCG weight loss and much more.  

To participate online and to view the webinar click here and follow the online registration instructions.
 
Participation is limited to the first 100 Attendees.

 

Friday, June 7, 2013

Occupational Regulation vs Public Health Benefits

A member of the Hawthorn community discusses current concerns with regard to nutrition advice.


Should consumers have the right to seek nutritional advice from whomever they deem will be the most helpful for themselves and their families?  Are you aware that there are different types of nutrition professionals and that an organization that represents one type is trying to create a monopoly for itself?  Have you ever wondered what the real reasons are behind such efforts, and what truly warrants exclusive, restrictive licensure laws?  Let’s begin to explore these issues to expand awareness, spur discussion and inspire positive action. 

Numerous natural health and health freedom organizations have exposed a disturbing and largely unseen effort underway that has the potential to severely restrict the choices consumers have when it comes to seeking nutritional advice.  In addition to the impact on consumers, this effort places increasingly restrictive limitations on people’s right to engage in an occupation, limiting jobs and free speech as a result.

It is a multi-faceted campaign being carried out by the trade organization for Registered Dietitians called the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND, formerly called the American Dietetic Association or ADA).  This recent article by the Alliance for Natural Health provides an excellent summary of what is taking place.  In a nutshell, the organization is working to pass monopolistic laws across the country that favor their brand of nutritional advice while limiting or even criminalizing other approaches.  They are also conducting acts of intimidation against holistic nutrition practitioners who have no history of client complaints.

This thought-provoking statement by the National Health Freedom Coalition/Action discusses how consumers deserve to have choices among the many healing modalities, whether conventional or alternative, mainstream or holistic, and that all people have an inherent right to seek—and practice—the care that most closely aligns with their needs and values.  There are numerous ways of acquiring and sharing knowledge, and making a livelihood from dispensing knowledge has always been commonplace in society.  There are increasing levels of restrictiveness when it comes to occupational regulation, spanning from the least restrictive which is registration (how you register yourself and your business) to certification (what you can call yourself), to the most restrictive which is licensure or the ability to practice at all in a particular field or occupation without attending certain schools and paying certain fees, etc.  The justification for enacting strict and exclusive licensing laws, according to the National Health Freedom Coalition/Action and others, must include imminent risk of harm to the public.  It is best to have the least restrictive regulation for safe occupations, if any, while ensuring proper disclosure of one’s background, training and qualifications in the practitioner-client relationship.   

Many people assume a license is the equivalent of a Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval and that it's warranted to protect us and serve us.  Indeed, many attempts to pass restrictive, exclusive occupational regulations are promoted under the guise of public safety.  But a level of harm must be evident to justify such regulations (think being a commercial airline pilot, performing surgery, or dispensing pharmaceutical drugs and controlled substances).  However, this is not the case when it comes to many of these regulations that deal with safe occupations where one group is singled out as the chosen one at the expense and exclusion of others.  The reality is that this is turf protection with the intent to limit or eliminate competition. 

The restrictions they enact provide steady and exclusive income for their professional organizations, approved schools, certification programs, insurance programs, etc.  Furthermore, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics receives funding from many multi-national processed food corporations such as McDonald’s, Kraft, and Coca-Cola, as discussed in this recent article by Dr. Mercola.  It is becoming evident to more and more people that these economic advantages are the real reasons such regulations are pushed.  But shouldn’t different schools of thought be allowed to exist and flourish simultaneously?  Shouldn’t consumers have the right to seek nutritional advice from practitioners unencumbered by the influence of Big Business, if they so choose? 

The Institute for Justice has produced some short videos that brilliantly illustrate the struggle that is taking place across many disciplines, including this one regarding a blogger who has been targeted with legal action for giving out dietary advice, and this one highlighting the bigger problem in society.  Luckily, some states are beginning to resist and reverse such laws and create exemptions (also called safe harbor laws) after realizing that such restrictive regulations are often unnecessary and are having a negative impact on job creation and citizen choice. 

It is important to acknowledge that there are many excellent Registered Dietitians who do not agree completely with the aforementioned tactics of the AND, and the AND’s actions in this regard are not a reflection of all Registered Dietitians. 

This short article is by no means a comprehensive account of this complex situation, and more education needs to take place on the topic.   There needs to be coordinated action that complements the work of natural health and health freedom organizations such as those listed in the References below.  Two things people can do are join those organizations and speak to their legislators. 

Take a few minutes to view the links in this article and share your thoughts below (anonymously, if you wish).  Please be thinking of ways we can collectively protect consumer and practitioner freedoms in the pursuit of wellness.

 

References
 
Alliance for Natural Health.  (2013, May 15).  ANH-USA Uncovers Suspicious Activity by State Dietetic and Health Boards. 

National Health Freedom Coalition.  (2003).  Findings and Recommendations for Health Freedom NHFC.